NEW Young Deep Cuts Policy Brief #3 Revitalizing U.S.-Russia Arms Control: An Integrated Approach

An ambitious U.S.-Russia arms control agenda must aim for a successful bilateral strategic stability dialogue and move towards global nuclear risk reduction through utilizing the P5 process and engaging NATO. The new Young Deep Cuts Policy Briefs shows how progress can be made.

Read the new Young Deep Cuts Policy Brief here

REGISTER NOW: Briefing - How the U.S.-Russian Strategic Stability Dialogue can and must help to move nuclear arms control and disarmament forward

The Deep Cuts Project invites you to the Zoom briefing:

How the U.S.-Russian Strategic Stability Dialogue can and must help to move nuclear arms control and disarmament forward

on

Tuesday, January 18, 2022

at

1:00-2:00 PM AM Washington, D.C.
7:00-8:00 PM Berlin
9:00-10:00 PM
Moscow

 

Please register here in advance for this webinar.
 

 

Relations between Russia and the West remain as fraught and tense as they were during the Cold War, with multiple points of friction and spheres of potential military confrontation – from the Baltic Sea to the Black Sea, in and around Ukraine, in outer space, and in cyberspace. At the same time, Russia and the United States have begun discussions on next steps in nuclear arms control. But how can Russia and the United States maintain verifiable limits on strategic nuclear warheads? How can both sides move swiftly and decisively to reduce strategic nuclear arsenals and avert a race in intermediate-range missiles? How can they extend arms control to include “tactical” nuclear weapons and make sure that missile defense systems do not undermine strategic stability? Under what conditions should additional nuclear weapon states be involved in nuclear arms control?

Against the background of the postponed NPT Review Conference, the outcome of discussions in the US-Russia Strategic Stability Dialogue, the meeting of the NATO-Russia Council and discussions in the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Angela Kane, Daryl Kimball and Andrei Zagorskiof the Deep Cuts Commissionwill discuss these questions. The inputs will be based on the Deep Cuts Commission Statement “How the U.S.-Russian Strategic Stability Dialogue Can and Must Make Progress”. Rüdiger Bohn, Deputy Federal Government Commissioner for Disarmament and Arms Control of the Federal Foreign Office will comment from a German perspective on ways to make progress on nuclear arms control and disarmament.

The session will be moderated by Oliver Meier, Senior Researcher at the IFSH Berlin office.

 

The Deep Cuts Project involves a trilateral Commission of experts from the U.S., Russia, and Germany. The Commission actively participates in and contributes to the debate on arms control regimes through means of realistic analyses and specific recommendations. The project is coordinated in its deliberations by the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg (IFSH), the Arms Control Association (ACA), and the Primakov Institute of World Economy and International Relations, Russian Academy of Sciences (IMEMO, RAN) with the active support of the German Federal Foreign Office.

Please note that this briefing will be recorded and published.

NEW Young Deep Cuts Policy Brief #2 From NATO to NPT and Beyond: Diversifying Debates, Expanding Nuclear Mindsets

Nuclear-weapon states and non-nuclear weapon states alike should envision an inclusive and open discussion on the principal drivers of the Humanitarian Initiative rather than focusing on the (in)compatibility between the TPNW and the NPT. The tenth NPT Review Conference in 2022 presents an opportunity to make progress on some of the issues at stake.


Read the new Young Deep Cuts Policy Brief here

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Statement by the Deep Cuts Commission - How the U.S.-Russian Strategic Stability Dialogue Can and Must Make Progress

For decades, the United States and Soviet Union (later Russia) have co-existed in a dangerous state of mutual nuclear vulnera­bility that requires effective dialogue, mili­tary restraint, and bold action to achieve deep cuts in their massive nuclear stock­piles.

It is in the interest of both sides that the Strategic Stability Dialogue (SSD) is effective and productive. In order to seize opportunities to reduce nu­clear dangers, both sides need to move swiftly and decisively. A top priority has to be the search for a follow-on agreement or agreements to the 2010 New START Treaty, the last remaining bilateral treaty capping the world’s two largest arsenals, before it ex­pires in early 2026.

 

Read the full Statement by the Deep Cuts Commission outlining next steps here

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NEW Young Deep Cuts Policy Brief #1 Immediate Priorities for US-Russian Arms Control

As arms control discussions commence in the US-Russia Strategic Stability Dialogue, Russia and the United States need to find compromise on some of the most difficult issue areas of future negotiations: long-range precision-guided weapons, missile defense systems, and non-strategic nuclear weapons.
Read the Young Deep Cuts Policy Brief here.

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Deep Cuts Briefing on Missile Defense

Deep Cuts Briefing to Launch the new Working Paper on "Missile Defense and the Offense-Defense Relationship"

Watch the full briefing here

On October 27, 2021, the Deep Cuts Project held a briefing to launch the new Deep Cuts Working Paper on “Missile Defense and the Offense-Defense Relationship”. Two distinguished members of the Deep Cuts Commission, namely Steven Pifer and Andrey Bakltiskiy, as well as guest author James Cameron from the University of Oslo discussed how missile defenses affect strategic stability and offer practical suggestions to limit the uncertainty over future missile defense capabilities. The briefing was moderated by Maren Vieluf, Researcher at the IFSH Berlin office.

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REGISTER NOW: Briefing on Missile Defense and the Offense-Defense Relationship

Missile Defense and the Offense-Defense Relationship

Launch Event

Deep Cuts Working Paper

on

Wednesday, October 27, 2021

at

10:30 AM Washington, D.C.
04:30 PM Berlin
05:30 PM Moscow

Missile defenses remain an obstacle to U.S.-Russia agreement on a new nuclear arms control accord. Both sides will need to address the offense-defense relationship in the Strategic Stability Dialogue, agreed by President Joseph Biden and Vladimir Putin at their June 2021 Geneva summit.

A new and comprehensive Deep Cuts Commission Working Paper by Andrey Baklitskiy, James Cameron and Steven Pifer takes a deep dive at the problem of missile defenses. The three renowned experts review how missile defenses affect strategic stability and offer practical suggestions to limit the uncertainty over future missile defense capabilities.

What could such measures look like? How can Russia and the United States avoid new arms races? At what point should China be brought into discussions on the offensive-defense relationship? How would a possible Russia-U.S. agreement affect NATO missile defenses? What role can Europeans play in managing offense-defense relationships?

The event will provide an opportunity to discuss with the three authors these questions as well as the conclusions and recommendations of their Deep Cuts Working paper.

The discussion will be moderated by Maren Vieluf, researcher at the IFSH Berlin office.

 

Please register in advance for this webinar:
https://ifsh-de.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_fI7VgssERm-kaarv7zCQTg

NEW Deep Cuts Working Paper #14 Missile Defense and the Offense-Defense Relationship

Missile defenses remain an obstacle to U.S.-Russia agreement on a new nuclear arms control accord. Both sides will need to address the offense-defense relationship in the Strategic Stability Dialogue, agreed by President Joseph Biden and Vladimir Putin at their June 2021 Geneva summit.

Read the Deep Cuts Working Paper here

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