Increasing Nuclear Threats through Strategic Missile Defense

Growing concerns about third-country nuclear threats led the United States to withdraw from the ABM Treaty’s constraints on the size and scope of ballistic missile defense arsenals in 2002. Inaccurate and alarmist projections of “rogue state” ICBM threats were critical in winning support for the decision to withdraw from the treaty and to sustain the multi-billion dollar annual price tag for developing, deploying, and expanding strategic missile defenses. But 18 years after Washington abandoned the treaty, North Korea is the only rogue state that could pose a near-term nuclear threat against the American homeland - and U.S. missile defense interceptors and radars have not even delivered high confidence of being able to protect against this threat. In his latest publication, Deep Cuts Commissioner Greg Thielmann comprehensively analyses the current state of missile defense. Read the full Working Paper here