In his latest blog post for The Brookings Institution, Deep Cuts Commissioner Steven Pifer suggests that "The Iran nuclear deal could open a possibility for reconsidering the SM-3 deployment plans. To get there, however, the Kremlin should offer something in the arms control field of interest to Washington and NATO." Click here ...

From a military standpoint, Western planners’ biggest headache is the defense of the Baltic states, located at the edge of NATO territory and hopelessly outnumbered by Russian troops. Indeed, the need to deter Russia will top the agenda when alliance leaders meet next month in Warsaw. But as they contemplate what military means might stop a swift, Crimea-type land grab, they should also review what they know about Moscow’s beliefs and motivations — and choose a path that might defuse, rather than elevate, regional tensions. Click here ...

During the second term of the Obama administration, U.S.-Russia relations have deteriorated to levels not seen since the Cold War. Nevertheles, the United States and Russia should seek a treaty that does not only limit existing strategic forces but also the weapons systems that both countries plan to develop and deploy in the next decade, argues Adam Mount of the Center for American Progress in this new Deep Cuts Working Paper. Click here ...

Für die Online-Redaktion der Frankfurter Allgemeinen Zeitung verfasste "Deep Cuts" Kommissionsmitglied Ulrich Kühn einen Meinungsartikel zum bevorstehenden Gipfel der NATO in Warschau. Mit Blick auf Russland und die Sicherheit der baltischen Staaten empfiehlt Kühn eine gesunde Mischung aus Abschreckung und Dialog. Click here ...

"Within the last decade, the United States has made several important adjustments to its plans for deploying missile defenses in Europe," writes Deep Cuts Commissioner Greg Thielmann in his latest blog post for the Arms Control Association. "In light of the ongoing implementation of the Iran nuclear deal and an objective assessment of Iran’s missile program, it is high time to make another one—suspending the deployment of more advanced Aegis missile defense interceptors to Poland." Click here ...

This new Deep Cuts Working Paper by Dennis M. Gormley addresses the difficult question of how missile defense and conventional precision-guided weapons complicate achieving deep cuts in nuclear weapons - particularly with a view to the strategic relationships to Russia and China and possible further cuts to nuclear weapons arsenals. Click here ...

In his article for The Washington Quarterly, Deep Cuts Commissioner Steven Pifer assesses President Obama's nuclear legacy. According to Pifer, "the scale of nuclear weapons reductions on Obama’s watch pales in comparison to the cuts that took place during the tenures of his three predecessors. Three factors (3 R’s) explain why the president has failed to fully realize his ambitious arms control agenda: Russians, Republicans, and reluctance. The Russians have shown little interest in reductions beyond those required by New START, and have knotted up the process by linking discussion of further cuts to other issues such as missile defense. Republicans on Capitol Hill have politicized arms control and sought to constrain and even reverse the president’s actions. And the administration’s own reluctance has led it to pass up opportunities to take bolder steps. Click here ...

"NATO is searching for a way to bring together proponents of power and supporters of order," says Deep Cuts Commissioner Ulrich Kühn in his most recent commentary for The National Interest. According to Kühn, "history suggests that the mix of defense and engagement can be much more productive" [for NATO than a sole concentration on military reassurance]. "An arms control offer, coupled with a deployment threat, is the best way to defend NATO’s frontline states, to deter Russia and to kick-start a dialogue with Moscow which could lead to laying the foundations for a more peaceful West-Russian coexistence." Click here ...

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