In his article for The Washington Quarterly, Deep Cuts Commissioner Steven Pifer assesses President Obama's nuclear legacy. According to Pifer, "the scale of nuclear weapons reductions on Obama’s watch pales in comparison to the cuts that took place during the tenures of his three predecessors. Three factors (3 R’s) explain why the president has failed to fully realize his ambitious arms control agenda: Russians, Republicans, and reluctance. The Russians have shown little interest in reductions beyond those required by New START, and have knotted up the process by linking discussion of further cuts to other issues such as missile defense. Republicans on Capitol Hill have politicized arms control and sought to constrain and even reverse the president’s actions. And the administration’s own reluctance has led it to pass up opportunities to take bolder steps. Click here ...

"NATO is searching for a way to bring together proponents of power and supporters of order," says Deep Cuts Commissioner Ulrich Kühn in his most recent commentary for The National Interest. According to Kühn, "history suggests that the mix of defense and engagement can be much more productive" [for NATO than a sole concentration on military reassurance]. "An arms control offer, coupled with a deployment threat, is the best way to defend NATO’s frontline states, to deter Russia and to kick-start a dialogue with Moscow which could lead to laying the foundations for a more peaceful West-Russian coexistence." Click here ...

"Never since the end of the Cold War have the international community and Europe been so deeply divided over the role of nuclear weapons in security policy," writes Deep Cuts Commissioner Oliver Meier in his latest post for SWP. "There is disagreement within the United Nations over whether to begin negotiations on a treaty banning nuclear weapons. At the same time, Russia’s aggression against Ukraine and Moscow’s associated nuclear threats have triggered a new discussion in NATO about enhancing its nuclear deterrent. Both debates are difficult and uncomfortable for Berlin, because they undermine the incremental arms control approach favoured by Germany. Against the background of the upcoming July 2016 NATO summit in Warsaw and the forthcoming establishment of a working group on nuclear disarmament in Geneva, Berlin must adopt a clear stance on nuclear deterrence if it is to play an active role in shaping the outcome of these discussions." Click here ...

Steven Pifer of the Deep Cuts Commission argues for the U.S. to not purchase a new air-launched cruise missile, known as the LRSO. In his latest blog post for the Brookings Institution, Pifer writes: "The U.S. military is about to embark on a modernization program to sustain the strategic nuclear triad. The program will generate a huge “bow wave” of spending requirements in the 2020s. One big problem: The Pentagon has no idea how to pay for it. The Obama administration and Congress should simplify the issue by shelving the Long-Range Stand-off Weapon (LRSO)." Click here ...

A new report outlining new approaches to Conventional Arms Control (CAC) in Europe has just been published by IFSH Hamburg. Contributors include, amongst others, Deep Cuts Commissioners Wolfgang Zellner (Germany) and Andrei Zagorski (Russia). The report is based on an international workshop which took place in Berlin in April 2015 and which sought to encourage international security experts to focus again on future frameworks for a CAC approach. As the report states: "the war in Ukraine has created a new sense of urgency about conventional arms control in Europe." Click here ...


In his latest analysis for "War On The Rocks", Deep Cuts Commissioner Ulrich Kühn takes on the ambivalent relationship of Germany towards NATO. Against the background of the Ukraine crisis, Germany might face a number of difficult decisions in the future, argues Kühn. Particularly the future nuclear posture of NATO and latest calls by American experts for strengthening U.S. nuclear deterrence commitments in Europe could help to undermine alliance solidarity. Click here ...

In his latest paper for the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium, Deep Cuts Commissioner Götz Neuneck takes on the issue of nuclear disarmament verification. The paper argues: "A number of scientific-technical activities have been carried out to establish more robust and irreversible disarmament verification schemes. Regardless of the actual path towards deeper reductions in nuclear arsenals or their total elimination in the future, disarmament verification will require new verification procedures and techniques. This paper discusses the information that would be required as a basis for building confidence in disarmament, how it could be principally verified and the role Europe could play." Click here ...

In his most recent blog post for the "Order from Chaos" blog of the Brookings Institution, Deep Cuts Commissioner Steven Pifer argues for a balanced mix of toughness and cooperation with Russia. According to Pifer, "we should not fear negotiating with the Russians, but we also should not cite a Cold War strawman to frighten ourselves into a negotiation or unwise concessions." [...] "Washington and Moscow cannot negotiate over the heads of Ukraine or other Europeans—those countries need to be subjects, not just objects, of the negotiation. Otherwise, we risk an unhappy lot who could frustrate implementation of any arrangement." Click here ...

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